Resources & Outreaches

CURRENT ANTI-POLICE SENTIMENT AND UNFAIR/BIASED MEDIA COVERAGE:
These realities can have a significant negative impact on our morale. Click HERE for a helpful article by Dr. Robin Kroll entitled, "Weathering the Storm."
 
 
APPLIED POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY SEMINARS
Applied positive psychology is "the scientific study of what enables individuals and communities to thrive." Positive psychology is concerned with what is right with people, their talents, abilities, and passions. Positive psychology assumes that people are basically healthy, resourceful and motivated to grow. It looks at peoples' strengths. It focuses on what makes life most worth living, including aspects of the human condition that lead to happiness, fulfillment, and flourishing. Our relationships with other people matter. Life has meaning and purpose when you see yourself as connected to something larger than yourself whether that is through religion, secular, nature, or friends and family. There is no easy formula to obtain happiness; you need to work at it. Do something for someone else. Little things add up. Positive psychology does not deny the negative side of life; we are all very aware that bad things happen in the world. We can use our strengths of character to deal with them. Sometimes people even experience post-traumatic growth after a traumatic incident. They're able to do this because of resilience.


Resilience is an appropriate segue to introduce the Army's Comprehensive Fitness (CSF) Program. In response to the increased stress and hardship on soldiers, the Army has chosen to focus on the well-being of its soldiers. The foundation of CSF is strong minds, strong bodies. The goal of CSF is to have soldiers as psychologically fit as they are physically fit. In order to accomplish this, CSF focuses on five dimensions of strength: physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and family. "Comprehensive Soldier Fitness is a structured, long term assessment and development program to build the resilience and enhance the performance of every soldier, family member, and Department of the Army civilian."
 
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF ALCOHOL/SUBSTANCE ABUSE:
Physical/Emotional:
- Displays persistent feelings of sadness, anger and guilt
- Rationalizes drinking
- Neglects eating / shows symptoms of malnourishment
- Shows signs of physical deterioration
- Experiences blackouts

Family/Home:
- Avoids family/friends
- Devalues personal relationships
- Shows lack of interest in intimacy
- Experiences general family chaos
- Fails to keep commitments, dates, promises and resolutions
- Avoids discussion about usage of drugs/alcohol

Employment:
- Misses time from work or other commitment
- Develops work or money problems
- Drinks at work
- Sneaks drinks
- Has disciplinary issues at work/gets suspended/quits or loses job
- Loses ambition and is unable to cope with responsibility

Behavioral:
- Changes habits such as sleeping, eating and hygiene
- Becomes more passive, withdrawn or irritable
- Exhibits grandiose or aggressive behavior
- Threatens/attempts suicide
- Drives under the influence
- Consumes alcohol while driving

Social:
- Changes friends/social groups
- Drinks in order to feel comfortable in social situations
- Experiences disapproval of drinking from others
- Preoccupied with using alcohol
- Increased social isolation
- Loss of outside interests
- Loss of relationships

Financial:
- Limited income/financial ruin/budget
- Loss of possessions
- Extensive credit card debt


Legal:
- Alcohol or other drug-related charges/arrests
- DUI or other legal problems associated with substance use


If you see these symptoms in yourself or someone close to you, please act on them. Call us for a referral, or reach out to our Employee Assistance Program (EAP): 312/743-0378.
 
 
POLICE-FRIENDLY A.A. GROUP: "NO COP-OUTS"
No Cop-Outs is a group of active and retired police officers who share the desire to stay sober. This support group, offering six meetings each week, is always open to new members. To learn more, click HERE.
 
Click HERE for a helpful article by Dr. Robin Kroll, published in September 2014 Police Chief Magazine, on the topic of officers with addiction.
 
 
P.A.D.: POLICE WITH ADDICTION AND DEPRESSION -- AN INDEPENDENT DUAL-DIAGNOSIS LAW ENFORCEMENT GROUP
A group of Police Officers with alcoholism and depression meets on Fridays from 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon, alternating north side / south side locations each week. Click HERE for details.
 
 
DEPRESSION AMONG FIRST RESPONDERS
Click HERE for a helpful article from American Addiction Centers on the topic of Depression among the police community and fire service.
 
 
FOOD, CLOTHING AND COAT DRIVE
Feel free to drop your donations at the Police Chaplains' offices, located on the second floor of the CPD Training Academy.

Contributions are given to St. Jude Police League supported organizations.
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MINISTRY TO OFFICERS INVOLVED IN SHOOTINGS
In a team effort with the Chicago Police Department Training and Education Academy Staff, we chaplains gather officers who (on duty or off) have been forced to use their weapon in the mission they swore to undertake: protection of the public.

The Officer-Involved Shooting (OIS) course generally takes place at the Training and Education Academy. Officers recently involved in an incident requiring deadly force are summoned to participate.

OIS incidents are extremely traumatic to our officers...even more so when an offender dies because of his or her threat to the public or the officer. While ultimately the injury or death of an offender stems from the offender's poor judgment, commission of a crime or creation of a substantial threat, officers forced to use their weapon are deeply affected by the incident. Our ministry to these officers is crucial in helping them to adjust and resolve to continue their important, most noble work.

Officers are most welcome to contact us for more information regarding the OIS course.
 
 
CRITICAL / TRAUMATIC INCIDENT MINISTRY
Members of the Chicago Police Chaplains Unit are the point of first contact by Department members involved in traumatic incidents of many sorts.

Click below for resources provided by the Northern Illinois Critical Incident Stress Management Team (NICISMT) to help identify and address issues related to critical / traumatic incidents. Please don't ever hesitate to call on us to help you through the healing process after such an incident.

Click HERE for NICISMT Critical Incident Information.
 
Also, a group of active and retired Chicago Police Officers who have been involved in critical incidents meets on a weekly basis. To learn more about this group, please contact its facilitator, Dr. Robin Kroll, by visiting www.drrobinkroll.com

The school of Psychiatry at Rush University Medical Center offers a program called ROAD HOME, providing assistance to veterans transitioning from military life to civilian life. The battle is over, but the journey is not.
Click HERE for more information.
INFORMATION FOR SPOUSES / SIGNIFICANT OTHERS REGARDING CRITICAL AND TRAUMATIC INCIDENTS
The Chicago Police Chaplains extend their ministry to not only our officers, but their families. If we may ever be of assistance in this regard, please feel free to contact us. Please also visit our "Information For Police families" link.

Also, the Northern Illinois Critical Incident Stress Management Team offers information and resources to loved ones of police officers involved in critical and traumatic incidents.

Click HERE for more information.
POST-TRAUMATIC INCIDENT CARE
Click HERE for a helpful article from the summer 2012 C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) magazine.
Click HERE for a link to the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Click HERE for an informative "American Police Beat" magazine (November, 2012) article on PTSD retreat opportunities.
Click HERE for a helpful article from Dr. Robin Kroll, from the September 2014 Illinois C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) magazine.
Click HERE for some helpful videos regarding PTSD. Continue to watch after the first video, as other helpful videos follow.
 
 
HEALING DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON
Click HERE for an informative article from the fall 2013 C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) magazine.
Click HERE for a helpful article from the fall 2012 C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) magazine.
DEALING WITH THE DEATH OF A CHILD
It is rightly said that there is no greater source of grief than the death of a child. The Chicago Police Chaplains prayerfully minister to Department members and retirees who have experienced such a tremendous loss.

We are a phone call / email away. Whether your child was born or unborn, 5, 15 or 50, allow us to help you through this MOST difficult time.

Our Lady of Pompeii Church on Chicago's near west side offers a regular one-day workshop for parents who have lost a child. While hosted by a Catholic church, all grieving parents of any faith tradition are welcome. For more information, visit www.ourladyofpompeii.org  or call 312/421-3757.

Also; the Northern Illinois Critical Incident Stress Management Team offers information and resources to those who have experienced such a loss.

Click HERE for more information.
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SUICIDE AWARENESS AND PREVENTION
An unfortunate reality: statistics show that those committed to military and law enforcement professions are more prone to commit suicide than the general public. In fact, nationwide, more than twice as many police officers take their own lives as are killed by aggressors.

Suicide warning signs:

Increased alcohol consumption

Emotional behavior – cries easily

Withdrawn

Talks of suicide

Writes or rewrites will

Is disillusioned

Lack of energy or motivation

Accident prone

Loss of love for profession

No longer concerned about physical appearance

Gives away cherished personal possessions

Plays with gun

Hopelessness

Exhibits signs of depression

Marital problems or bad relationship

Loss due to death or divorce

Terminal illness

Disability/retirement/trouble with law or authority

Feels responsible for partner’s death

Involved in a shooting

Experiencing considerable financial hardship

About to be indicted or go to court / administrative hearing for some kind of wrongdoing

In light of these warning signs, if you have a friend or loved one about whom you are concerned in this regard, PLEASE ask these questions:

(Ask POINT BLANK!) “Are you thinking about hurting or killing yourself?”

“Have you decided how you are going to do it?”

“Have you thought about WHEN you are going to do it?”
YOU MUST ACT ON ANY POSITIVE RESPONSES.
Resources… don’t hesitate to call! And do not leave the individual alone at this point.

P.O.L.I.C.E. Suicide Foundation: 866/276-4615
 
Employee Assistance Program (EAP…Chicago Police Professional Counseling 24/7…and CONFIDENTIALITY IS GUARANTEED): 312/743-0378
 
 
WHAT TO DO WHEN SOMEONE YOU KNOW APPEARS SUICIDAL...
Click HERE for a helpful article from the Mayo Clinic staff regarding this difficult subject.
GOING THROUGH A TOUGH TIME? CALL EAP!
The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is a FREE and CONFIDENTIAL unit of the Chicago Police Department supporting all officers, their friends, and family members who may be in need. The professional counseling service offers assistance with depression, drugs, alcohol, or plain day-to-day issues we face doing our jobs. Many of our friends and family members suffer feelings of anxiety and loneliness. If someone you know needs help, please refer them to EAP where therapists are on call 24 hours a day. If they are contemplating suicide, don't keep it a secret, call: EAP - 312-743-0378.

Suicide Hotline – 1-800-SUICIDE

****Remember, this is confidential****
 
LOVING OUTREACH TO SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE
Click HERE for information on the LOSS (Loving Outreach to Survivors of Suicide) programs for adults and children, offered by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago.
 
DEALING WITH THE REALITY OF GRIEF AND MOURNING
The Center for Loss and Life Transition offers terrific resources from explaining what GRIEF and MOURNING are, to dealing with this reality yourself or helping others to grieve/mourn. Click HERE for more information on this very important topic.
 
 
DEALING WITH A DIVERSE PUBLIC
Click HERE for helpful streaming videos highlighting the diverse public we serve, and how to best accommodate their varied needs with efficiency and sensitivity.
OFFERING COMPASSIONATE WORDS TO CIVILIANS FOLLOWING THE LOSS OF THEIR CHILD
You may wish to have handy some compassionate (but not trite) words to say to parents who have lost children to violence, accidents, suicides, etc.

Here are some helpful things you can say / offer:


- I am very sorry for your loss.
- Is there a family pastor or member of the clergy I can contact for you?


And here are some things that are not helpful and should be avoided:

- Don't cry.
- It was his / her time.
- It must have been for the best.
- He / she is in a better place.
- I would die if I were you.
- God never gives us more than we can handle.
- Don't worry, things will be OK.
- Time is a great healer.
- Hang in there.
- God must have needed another angel in heaven.
- I know how you're feeling. (The only time you might use this is if you have personally experienced what they are going through and are comfortable sharing with them.)

You'll notice the "Don't say" list is a lot longer than the "Do say" list. That's because when in doubt, saying nothing at all will prove more beneficial than making a trite, overused or insensitive statement. Your silent presence speaks volumes.

When leaving, if you're comfortable with it, something like this might be appreciated: "Again, I'm very sorry. I will keep your family in my prayers." (If you use this one, then please be sure to make good on it in your personal prayers!)

While perhaps you're not ministers, and you have a job to do in short time with limited resources, it never hurts to show some compassion when dealing with grieving civilians.
OTHER VALUABLE RESOURCES AND OUTREACHES CAN BE FOUND BY VISITING THE PCM LINKS PAGE (click HERE)
 
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